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02-Aug-2017 21:14

I was spoiled, wanted for nothing, and had everything. Then I married a man whose immediate family consists of 24 people. Family gatherings take place as often as daily since the entire family lives in very close proximity to one another.

Before meeting my husband he was feeling the Arabian pressure of ‘marriage’.

For a woman to shed a tear and a man be the cause is shameful. Large family gatherings happened once a year during family reunion time and even that came to an abrupt halt when my grandparents died.

Fortunately my husband does fit comfortably into this part of the culture he appears to have left so far behind. The typical Southern Belle raised as an only child in America. I never had to share anything with anyone — even my space.

He’s actually more Westernized than many ‘city’ Arabs I know.

His English is perfect, he’s been to America and fully understands our mentality, culture, and politics.

They accept I need a fork to eat my meals and they’ve always accommodated me without making me feel awkward.

I’m never left out of family events and they even go out of their way to embrace things from my culture.

He doesn’t judge others and he understands why some people might ‘wonder’ about us. Don’t allow others decide who you should be with or how you should live your life.But we go to the local co-op and people literally stop what they’re doing to stare. I respect that more than the stares, and I think my husband appreciates it more as well.My husband is very out-going and friendly to everyone.This post is my little attempt at clearing up some of the misconceptions regarding the Arab/American marriages.

Perhaps I should clarify a bit; my husband is not only an Arab, but he’s a bedoin (desert) Arab.

I’m just so thankful, every day, that I married a man who is the perfect combination of East and West. We live in a very tribal area where Americans are almost never seen.